• Rajani Katta MD & Jenny Li-Wang BA

Casper Practice Test: Example Scenarios

Updated: May 18


In this post, I'll provide example Casper scenarios and questions and my take on how to answer them.


If you'd like to jump straight to your area of interest, please see these posts that address specific areas related to Casper test prep:


  1. Background on the Casper test

  2. Format of the Casper test

  3. How is the Casper test graded?

  4. Tips and strategies for how to prepare for the Casper

  5. Types of Casper test questions and how to answer them

  6. Example Casper questions and responses

  7. The Casper Test Prep Guide (with full-length sample test)


NOTE: We are currently adding to these scenarios please check back later for updated post.


Scenario:

You are friends with both Daphne and Natalie. They have planned to take a trip together, which is three months away. Daphne has started making the travel arrangements. After first confirming with Natalie, she put down a deposit on a rental house. One week later she asked Natalie to contribute her share of the deposit. Natalie emailed her back and said that she was no longer able to take the trip. And since the trip was still three months away, she was confident that Daphne could find somebody to take her place and so she would not be contributing to the deposit.

Daphne is upset by this response, and she turns to you for advice. What do you say to her?

Weak Response:

I would suggest that Daphne ask Natalie to pay her share of the deposit. Natalie made a commitment, and it's important to honor our commitments. The fact that the trip is 3 months away does not negate the fact that Daphne asked her friend for confirmation before paying the deposit. Since Natalie made the commitment, the ethical thing to do is to pay the deposit even if she cannot take the trip.

Why is this response weak?

Although the response does highlight the applicant's ethics, it is weak in several important areas.


  • It lacks empathy, mainly because it's not looking at this situation from Natalie's point of view.

  • There is only one approach suggested, and therefore just doesn't showcase the applicant's creative problem-solving skills.

  • This approach also doesn't highlight the applicant's sense of collaboration, because there's no indication of people working together to reach a solution.


Here are 4 different examples of stronger responses, all of which use the overall I3P framework

Sample Response 1

Issues/ Impact/ Information/ Potential Approaches

This is challenging, because it brings up issues of fairness, reliability, and the importance of upholding your commitments, and it has the potential to impact their friendship and both of their finances. I would start by asking Daphne to seek more information, especially on Natalie’s reasons for backing out and her understanding of the financial impact. It is possible that Natalie is dealing with financial troubles or other issues that are overwhelming her. If Natalie is having financial issues, then Daphne should ask if she can contribute in other ways, such as finding a replacement. If Natalie is simply backing out because she no longer wants to go, then Daphne should ask for reimbursement, either via payment now or via a payment plan.



Sample Response 2

Information/ Issues/ Impact/ Potential Approaches


I would start by asking more questions, especially the reasons for Natalie’s backing out. It’s difficult to deal with issues of financial responsibility and commitments, and this situation may impact their friendship and both of their finances. If Natalie was having financial problems, I would ask her to contribute in other ways, such as by finding a replacement. If she had just changed her mind, I would respectfully explain her responsibility and ask for reimbursement or a replacement.

Sample Response 3

Information/ Impact/ Issues/ Potential Approaches

I would not jump to conclusions, because there are several reasons why Natalie may be backing out, and this situation may impact their friendship and their finances. Issues of financial responsibilities and commitments to friends can be challenging. If Natalie was having financial problems, I would find out if there were other ways she could still take the trip and fulfill her commitment, such as by earning money by working extra shifts. If she was feeling overwhelmed, perhaps she could do the work to find a replacement travel partner. If she had just changed her mind, I would make sure that I respectfully explained the impact of her decision and why she was still responsible for the deposit because she had made a commitment.

Sample Response 4

Issues/ Impact/ Information/ Potential Approaches

What do we owe a friend to whom we made a commitment? Issues of commitments and financial responsibility can be challenging, because they impact friendships, personal finances, and personal values. I would first ask about Natalie’s reasons for backing out. If she was having financial problems, I would see if she could still honor her commitment by finding other ways of earning money. If she had just changed her mind, I would explain why it would not be fair to just back out of her commitment, and would encourage her to find a way to honor her commitment and not have Daphne bear the full weight, such as by finding a replacement or paying Daphne her share of the deposit.



Team members at a coffee shop


Your role: You are an employee at a coffee shop.


Prompt: You work the opening shift at a coffee shop. Your coworker, Matthew, is chronically late to work. Another coworker, May, tells you she is frustrated that Matthew is not doing his fair share of work, especially because your mornings are so busy and the shop is already understaffed. She wants to confront Matthew with her frustrations. What would you advise her to do?


Image showing to men in a coffee shop from the scenario.
What would you do in a situation like this?


Coach of a high school volleyball team


You are the coach of a high school volleyball team. Your team is playing at a national conference next week. One of your star players, Amy, comes into practice one day with a sprained ankle. Amy insists that the doctor cleared her to play in the tournament next week, but her father tells you privately that he does not want Amy playing due to the risk of re-injury, especially because she is planning on going to college with a sports scholarship. Would you allow Amy to play in the national conference? Why or why not?



For more on how to prepare for the Casper test, please see the other posts in this series.

  1. Background on the Casper test

  2. Format of the Casper test

  3. How is the Casper test graded?

  4. Tips and strategies for how to prepare for the Casper

  5. Types of Casper test questions and how to answer them

  6. Example Casper questions and responses

  7. The Casper Test Prep Guide (with full-length sample test)

 

Dr. Rajani Katta is the creator of Medical School Interviewing 101, the course that teaches students how to ace their interviews. She is also the author of the Multiple Mini Interview: Winning Strategies from Admissions Faculty, the Casper Test Prep Guide, and The Medical School Interview. Dr. Katta is a practicing dermatologist and served as a Professor of Dermatology at the Baylor College of Medicine for over 17 years.

Jennifer Li-Wang is the author of The Casper Test Prep Guide and a graduate of Rice University with a double major in English and the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality (SWGS). Jenny grew up in Los Alamos, New Mexico and in her free time enjoys reading and running her small crochet business.






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